Africa & Early Life

Sunrise in Kenya.

Sunrise in Kenya.

Dr. William Maples began his career as an anthropologist at the Field Site at Darajani in Kenya. As a graduate student, Maples and his wife, Margaret Kelley moved to East Africa in 1962 to study baboon taxonomy and conduct research studies on other non-human primates. After three years the couple and their two daughters returned to the U.S. and Maples earned his Ph.D.. 

In Maples’ autobiography, Dead Men Do Tell Tales, he writes,

“My years in Kenya confirmed me in the path I had chosen. Africa poured forth gifts that I have always treasured, made me a better teacher, and gave me a perspective that broadened and deepened my research.”

After returning to the US, Maples continued to research primates in Silver Springs, Florida. 

Non-Human Primate display case

One of Maples' field notebooks from Kenya and a sample from his collection of non-human primate skulls.

Africa & Early Life