The Romanov Family

The Russian Imperial Romanov family. From left to right: Grand Duchess Anastasia, Grand Duchess Olga, Tsar Nicholas II, Tsarevich Alexei, and Grand Duchess Tatiana. 
 

The Russian Imperial Romanov family. From left to right: Grand Duchess Anastasia, Grand Duchess Olga, Tsar Nicholas II, Tsarevich Alexei, and Grand Duchess Tatiana. 

 

Detail of the Execution Room in the Ipatiev House Half Cellar.

Image of basement of Ipatiev house where the execution took place.

On July 17, 1918, the Russian Imperial Romanov family was executed by Bolshevik troops, the details of which was long kept in secrecy. The family's ultimate fate became an enduring mystery throughout the twentieth century, triggering countless theories and false claimants to the dynastic bloodline. A burial pit was later uncovered in 1979, but it was not until 1992 that a formal inquiry was submitted to American experts requesting an examination of what was speculated to be the ill-fated royal family. Dr. William Maples—along with a team of highly trained experts, including forensic odontologist  Dr. Lowell Levine—journeyed to Russia in order to conduct an investigation as to whether or not the skeletal remains were in fact that of the Romanovs.

A crew, one of whom is Dr. Michael Baden, studying the Romanov grave site. 

A crew, one of whom is Dr. Michael Baden, studying the Romanov grave site. 

Initial examinations of the individual remains confirmed witness accounts of the night the Romanovs went missing. One of the distinct identifying features was the exquisite dentistry found in several of the skulls, such as platinum crowns and gold fillings, which is compelling evidence that the wearer was almost certainly a member of the royal family. Subsequent genetic testing on distant relatives has confirmed that the uncovered remains were in fact those of the Romanovs.   

The Romanov Family